Bonus Reds prospects: Nos. 21-25

They say that imitation is the greatest form of flattery. I hope it’s true because I’m about to rip Jim Callis off.

Over the past couple of weeks, Jim has been unveiling his extra prospects, Nos. 21-25, for the 10 teams that were his responsibility on the Team Top 20 lists on Prospect Watch. If you’ve missed them, head to Callis’ Corner right now. They’re well worth the read.

After seeing his work, I figured it was high time that I got on board and did the same thing with my lists. So, with a tip of the cap to Jim, we’ll kick things off with the Cincinnati Reds and work my way through my other teams alphabetically (Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Miami Marlins, Minnesota Twins, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners, Tampa Rays).

21. Taylor Sparks, 3B: Sparks was ranked No. 56 on our Draft Top 200 and ended up being taken in the second round, No. 58 overall. Which means, of course, that we nailed his ranking. Sparks is a big, strong right-handed hitter with some ability to hit for average and power. He also has the defensive chops to stick at the hot corner. He’s making his pro debut in the rookie-level Pioneer League.

 

22. Wyatt Strahan, RHP: This USC right-hander was ranked No. 105 on that top 200 list and went No. 94 overall, in the third round. He served as his school’s Friday night starter in 2014 and he was a pretty good one. He  uses a solid sinking fastball that can touch the mid-90s along with an outstanding curve. He shows good feel for his changeup as well. As long as that keeps coming and he refines his command, his size and stuff point to a future in the middle of a rotation.

23. Seth Mejias-Brean, 3B: Taken in the 8th round of the 2012 Draft out of the University of Arizona, Mejias-Brean earned a promotion to Double-A this year after putting up very good numbers in the California League. Yes, that’s a hitting-friendly place, but he’s shown an ability to hit for average with an advanced approach at the plate since being drafted. He’s been more of a contact guy than a power guy, which leads to the question about whether he can profile as a big league regular at an infield corner.

24. Kyle Waldrop, OF: The 2010 12th rounder out of high school also has reached Double-A Pensacola this season. He’s putting up career numbers, but again, some of that is Cal League driven. Still, Waldrop is showing the ability to hit for average and some power while displaying some improved plate discipline skills. He’s played a lot of right field, but some think left is his ultimate destination. The good news is his bat might get him to the big leagues at that spot.

25. Aristides Aquino, OF: It’s been a slow climb for Aquino, the Dominican corner outfielder the Reds signed in January 2011, as he’s yet to reach full-season ball. He’s also only 20, and it pays to be patient with young international signees. He showed signs of progress last year in the rookie-level Arizona League and that’s carried over this season in the Pioneer League. He has a ton of power potential, which should continue to show up more consistently in games as he moves along (though he’s made strides there this year). He has a strong arm and fits the profile of the prototypical right fielder very well. Continue to be patient Reds fans; the payoff could be huge.

 

5 Comments

Aquino deserves better than #25. So far batting .300, 14 HR, 16 SB at short-season Pioneer League, and he’s still just 20 years old.

Pingback: Bonus Rockies prospects: Nos. 21-25 « B3: Big, Bald and Beautiful

why is Marquez Smith not rated with his no.

J.W. — I like Aquino, but it’s taken him a while to get to the point where he is now. Yes, he’s still plenty young enough. I could see him easily move up the list for next year, or mid-season next year if he hits full-season ball and continues to produce like this.

Roland — While Marquez Smith has put up good numbers, it’s important to note that he’s 29 years old and doing all that damage in the hitting-friendly California League. Bakersfield, his home park, is really, really hitting-friendly. According to baseball-reference, Smith is 6.2 years older than the average hitter in the Cal League. That really puts him in non-prospect territory.

Thanks for the feedback!

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