Results tagged ‘ MLB Prospects ’

Bonus Royals prospects: Nos. 21-25

It’s time to continue my march through the bonus prospects on each of my lists. Next up: the Kansas City Royals.

Not long ago, the Royals had the label of “best farm system” bestowed upon them, with a slew of pitching (mostly left-handed) prospects. Some have made it (Danny Duffy, finally), some have not (Chris Dwyer), some have been traded (Jake Odorizzi, Wil Myers as one of the hitting prospects) and some are slowly working their way back from injury (John Lamb, who is now back on the Royals’ Top 20). As I said in the most recent Pipeline Inbox, it’s a cautionary tale to not make a huge leap from a talent-laden system to guaranteeed big league success.

That being said, the Royals system today is pretty solid, with six players in the current Top 100. Recent drafts have certainly helped, and beyond the Top 100 guys, there is some interesting, and young, talent. So this 21-25 has some potential:

21. Cody Reed, LHP: Reed was on the Top 20 earlier in the year (No. 15 at the start of the year), but came off with the additions made via the Draft. He’s going to land back on the list when it’s time for Christian Colon to graduate due to service time. The tall left-hander taken from the junior college ranks in 2013 has had an up-and-down first full season performance-wise, but his fastball-slider combination is plenty good enough. If Reed’s changeup can continue to improve, he has a chance to start, though a future in the bullpen seems a bit more likely.

22. Lane Adams, OF: A former two-sport star who could’ve played Division I college basketball, Adams has made slow progress up the Royals’ ladder, but it looks like he could be a late bloomer. His speed is his best tool, and it gets a plus grade. He’s a base-stealing threat and his speed plays well in the outfield. He’s played all three spots, though he’s only been in center this season in Double-A.  He’s starting to show a little more pop as well. At worst, he profiles as a very good fourth outfielder. If the bat continues to come, then who knows?

23. Brandon Downes, OF: He didn’t have the kind of season many hoped for (a wrist injury didn’t help), as some thought Downes could move up Draft boards since there were so few good college bats in the 2014 Draft class, but he is big, strong and athletic. Coming from a program like Virginia, fresh off making it to the College World Series championship, doesn’t hurt either, and the Royals felt he was worth a seventh-round selection. He’s had a solid pro debut in the Pioneer League. He has a short, quick swing and can make hard contact to all fields. There should be more power in his bat as he matures. He’s a solid defensive center fielder with decent speed.

24. Zane Evans, C: A really strong pro debut in 2013 had many excited to see what this Georgia Tech product would do in his first full year. The fourth round pick went straight to the Class A Advanced Carolina League, where got off to a hot start with the bat, but has struggled since. He has some extra-base pop and has shown a solid approach at the plate. He has plenty of arm strength — he was Georgia Tech’s closer and hit the mid-90s off the mound — but is still working on his hands and footwork. If the defense can come, the Royals still feel with his power potential, he could develop into an offensive-minded regular behind the plate. If all else fails, they could always put him back on the mound as a power reliever.

25. Humberto Arteaga, SS/2B: Arteaga began the year ranked No. 19, but the combination of 2014 draftees and the young Venezuelan infielder’s struggles knocked him off the list. Signed to a seven-figure bonus in 2010, he’s had some difficulty establishing himself in full-season ball the last two seasons. He’s still just 20, so there’s plenty of time. Arteaga’s best tools are defensive ones. He has enough arm and range to be an above-average defender at shortstop, and he’s also seen time at second (though not as much this year). How much his bat develops will determine what his future role is. He’s an aggressive hitter who needs to add strength and refine his approach at the plate. He’s likely to always be the type who hits at the bottom of a big league lineup, but the glove might be enough to get him there, at least as a utilityman.

 

Bonus Rockies prospects: Nos. 21-25

On Friday, I began the look at my extra prospects, posting my Reds No. 21-25 list. Now it’s time to move on to the Colorado Rockies.

The Rockies system is a pretty good one, with three players in the Top 50 and five in the Top 100 . But even beyond that, it’s a pretty deep system, with good talent throughout. There’s even talent to be found in this next set of five names, always a good sign for an organization.

21. Jordan Patterson, OF/1B: A fourth-round pick out of South Alabama in 2013, Patterson has enjoyed a solid first full season, though offensive numbers need to be taken with a grain of salt given that his home field in Asheville is one of the most extreme hitters’ parks in the Minor Leagues (his home/road splits are skewed in that direction). But scouts like his swing and think he has the chance to hit. He’s got a big, strong body with the potential for more power to come. If that power develops, he could be a prototypical right fielder, with a strong arm and the run producing bat to match.

22. Jose Briceno, C: Briceno signed out of Venezuela back in 2009 and has come along slowly, reaching the South Atlantic League late last year and spending his first full season (after two summers in the Dominican Summer League and time in the Pioneer League as well) in Ahseville again. His top two tools that stand out are about power: his arm and his bat. He has a gun behind the plate and can neutralize the running game and he has the chance to have some pop as a hitter (home/road splits once again apply). He’s slowly becoming a better all-around hitter and he continues to work on the other parts of his defensive game.

23. Kevin Padlo, 3B: The Rockies nabbed Padlo in the fifth round of this past June’s Draft, No. 143 overall. At the time of the Draft, the SoCal high school third baseman was ranked No. 129 on our Top 200. The previous year, the Rockies took Ryan McMahon in the second round (another SoCal HS 3B) and there are some similarities there. Padlo has the chance to hit for power and stick at third, a nice combination. He was excelling as an 18-year-old in the Pioneer League during his pro debut.

24. Ryan Castellani, RHP: We had Castellani No. 131 on the Top 200 and he went No. 48 (2nd round) in the Draft. With a solid feel for pitching, Castellani was sent to the short-season Northwest League for his pro debut and he was holding his own as one of the youngest performers there. He has a good three-pitch mix in his fastball, curve and changeup with the chance to add some strength to his 6-foot-4 frame.

25. Patrick Valaika, SS/2B: This is a family rite of passage. Older brother Chris has spent parts of four seasons in the big leagues. Older brother No. 2, Matt, spent a year in the Cardinals organization. Patrick was taken in the ninth round out of UCLA in 2013. In his full-season debut this year, he earned a promotion from Asheville up to Modesto. Like all the Valaikas, he plays the game the right way, has shown an ability to play multiple positions and can swing the bat a little.

 

Bonus Reds prospects: Nos. 21-25

They say that imitation is the greatest form of flattery. I hope it’s true because I’m about to rip Jim Callis off.

Over the past couple of weeks, Jim has been unveiling his extra prospects, Nos. 21-25, for the 10 teams that were his responsibility on the Team Top 20 lists on Prospect Watch. If you’ve missed them, head to Callis’ Corner right now. They’re well worth the read.

After seeing his work, I figured it was high time that I got on board and did the same thing with my lists. So, with a tip of the cap to Jim, we’ll kick things off with the Cincinnati Reds and work my way through my other teams alphabetically (Colorado Rockies, Kansas City Royals, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Miami Marlins, Minnesota Twins, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Seattle Mariners, Tampa Rays).

21. Taylor Sparks, 3B: Sparks was ranked No. 56 on our Draft Top 200 and ended up being taken in the second round, No. 58 overall. Which means, of course, that we nailed his ranking. Sparks is a big, strong right-handed hitter with some ability to hit for average and power. He also has the defensive chops to stick at the hot corner. He’s making his pro debut in the rookie-level Pioneer League.

 

22. Wyatt Strahan, RHP: This USC right-hander was ranked No. 105 on that top 200 list and went No. 94 overall, in the third round. He served as his school’s Friday night starter in 2014 and he was a pretty good one. He  uses a solid sinking fastball that can touch the mid-90s along with an outstanding curve. He shows good feel for his changeup as well. As long as that keeps coming and he refines his command, his size and stuff point to a future in the middle of a rotation.

23. Seth Mejias-Brean, 3B: Taken in the 8th round of the 2012 Draft out of the University of Arizona, Mejias-Brean earned a promotion to Double-A this year after putting up very good numbers in the California League. Yes, that’s a hitting-friendly place, but he’s shown an ability to hit for average with an advanced approach at the plate since being drafted. He’s been more of a contact guy than a power guy, which leads to the question about whether he can profile as a big league regular at an infield corner.

24. Kyle Waldrop, OF: The 2010 12th rounder out of high school also has reached Double-A Pensacola this season. He’s putting up career numbers, but again, some of that is Cal League driven. Still, Waldrop is showing the ability to hit for average and some power while displaying some improved plate discipline skills. He’s played a lot of right field, but some think left is his ultimate destination. The good news is his bat might get him to the big leagues at that spot.

25. Aristides Aquino, OF: It’s been a slow climb for Aquino, the Dominican corner outfielder the Reds signed in January 2011, as he’s yet to reach full-season ball. He’s also only 20, and it pays to be patient with young international signees. He showed signs of progress last year in the rookie-level Arizona League and that’s carried over this season in the Pioneer League. He has a ton of power potential, which should continue to show up more consistently in games as he moves along (though he’s made strides there this year). He has a strong arm and fits the profile of the prototypical right fielder very well. Continue to be patient Reds fans; the payoff could be huge.

 

It’s (Minor League) Opening Day!

That’s right, folks. Today’s the day we get to watch all those prospects (save those in the big leagues) in action. You can check out my story about where the Top 100 prospects are playing right here. And I highly recommend the MiLB.TV package so you can watch these guys in action.

Obviously, I’m not the only one excited for Opening Day. The players are fired up about the start of the 2014 season. I asked Marlins prospect Andrew Heaney (He pitches Friday for Double-A Jacksonville, a game that is on MiLB.TV.) about what Opening Day means to him and what his hopes for the 2014 season are. Here’s his outstanding response:

“Opening day means a fresh start both individuals and as a team. It’s my first minor league opening day because I was hurt last year. I wanna prove myself throughout the course of a full year. I want to get better at the things I need to work on. If I can do that I’ll consider it a successful season for myself.” — Andrew Heaney

The Twitterverse has been ablaze with Opening Day excitement as well. Here’s a string of what some of the game’s best prospects have been  tweeting yesterday and today:

There are obviously many  more. You can check out my list of top prospects or, even better, look at the comprehensive one @MLBPipeline has going

Cubs camp extras

Not a lot of extras from my final camp visit. I guess I left it all out on the field. You can see if you agree by reading my Spring Training camp report. You can also view the Cubs’ Top 20 list, Bernie Pleskoff’s take on how the system fists the big league needs, as well as Jim Callis’s 21-25 prospects (he did their Top 20).

Here’s the video piece:

 

There was one answer Neil Ramirez gave me, before we were rudely interrupted by a team meeting (what nerve). I asked him about what had happened to cause him to kind of back up after he made that huge leap forward in 2011, and what he’s been able to do to get past it (He was better in 2013 than in 2012).

Ramirez: I think I put a little too much pressure on myself after 2011 coming into 2012. I thought I had to do a little too much. Now I’m back to worrying about what I can control.

Good news for the Cubs, who while rich with hitters, could use Ramirez’s contributions on the pitching front.

With that in mind, my One More Guy is another arm:

OK, it might seem like a copout because Callis has him at No. 21, too, but I still like Duane Underwood‘s upside, even after his terrible 2013. One of the key reasons for his struggles was the fact he was not in good shape to start the year. But when I was in Cubs camp, farm director Jaron Madison used Underwood as an example of one of a few arms who had really worked hard this offseason. I’m intersted to see what that translates to on the mound in 2014.

 

Dodgers camp extras

After a brief hiatus (I got to spend some quality time with the B3 family), I’m back at it, heading to Arizona after my travels through Florida. On the site today are reports from Dodgers and Giants camp (I’ll post separately on my Giants extras).

For the Dodgers, be sure to check out:

I do have some extra stuff from 2013 first-rounder Chris Anderson. We talked a bit about the struggles he had at times during his junior season at Jacksonville (which led to a really interesting talk about pitch counts — he’s not a fan). At any rate, I asked him if he was concerned about how he was up-and-down a little bit and what impact that would have on his Draft status:

Anderson: I wasn’t too worried about it. I think every pitcher has those days when it’s just not their day. The college season is so short, you’re under a lot of pressure to perform every single week, but you only have a couple of months to perform. With those rough starts, I think it made me better, I learned from them and got better as I went on with the year.

You come to an organization that has a pretty good track record for developing pitching, especially power arms. How excited are you to be in that next wave of guys to be able to keep building on that track record?

Anderson: I’m very excited. I’m blessed to get this opportunity with the Dodgers here. They’ve given me a great opportunity. I’ve just come out here to work hard and try to become the best I can be.

My One More Guy would be Jesmuel Valentin. Maybe I’m putting too much stock in the MLB bloodlines, but I think he still has a chance to hit, probably play 2B, and has a good understanding of the game.

 

Yankees camp extras

My last Spring Training stop in Florida was at the Yankees’ Minor League facility.  Here’s the resulting Spring Training report, as well as the new Top 20 ranking and Bernie Pleskoff’s take on how the system fits the organization’s needs. Jim blogged his picks for prospects Nos. 21-25.

Here’s the video piece:

And boy, do I have extras for you. Yankees’ senior vice president of baseball operations Mark Newman and I discussed all sorts of things during our chat. First, about Mason Williams and previous reports about his lack of effort:

Newman: It hasn’t been this spring and it wasn’t for most of the time last year, either. He has momentary relapses, and they’re relapses out of frustration. He’s doing fine there. With young kids, it happens. There aren’t many Derek Jeters who show up here and know what it’s like to play hard every day. So we teach them that. Gary Sanchez and Mason are 21, 22; they’re like college juniors. They’re learning this stuff.

Some of the problems, Newman thinks, stem from the amount of attention young players get before they set foot in the big leagues. Some can handle it, others can struggle, not only with expectations, but with a certain sense of entitlement that can come with fame that comes prematurely (at least in Newman’s opinion):

Newman: Twenty-five years ago, when I started doing this, people didn’t do what you’re doing. I never talked to anybody about prospects. If I had my way, I’d never talk about them ever. They haven’t done anything yet. Now they have this notoriety in short order and they haven’t done anything to deserve it, other than be talented. They won the gene pool. They have to learn how to play and perform. They’re making progress. Mason’s problem is not going to be effort.

Now, if you thought Newman was talkative, you need to meet Eric Jagielo, one of the most engaging prospects I’ve met to date. Here’s the rest of our conversation.

Going back to last year, at what point did you get to finally take a breath and look back at everything that happened?

Jagielo: I was able to take some time off right after instructs. I was able to go back to Chicago for a little, then go to Notre Dame. I think that was the first time it all kind of settled in. I was planning on working out at Notre Dame, so I was there. I was able to see some friends and guys from my class and realized that my life had changed a little bit, for the best. But I was in a different kind of spot. Was the chance to reminisce a little bit. My three years at Notre Dame were the best years of my life. This is a new chapter and I’m excited to get it started.

Was it weird to be there and your friends are still in classes?

Jagielo: Especially the first couple of weeks. The coaches here, they said to make sure to take my time off. The college season, it was basically three years straight, with going into fall, then to spring, then to summer ball and then right back to fall ball. It was kind of three years of straight baseball. Especially with the hamstring injury, I really wanted to get healthy for this first full season of pro ball and be an everyday guy. Everything is good. The Yankees did a wonderful job, keeping me back for a couple of weeks after the Draft, smoothing things out and making sure there was nothing wrong with it. Then, when I did make the debut in Staten island, I was ready to go. I felt fine there. I was able to participate in instructs and get the best instruction.

You’re 21, you’re working out with Derek Jeter. How long did it take before you weren’t star struck?

Jagielo: Looking back at it now, I don’ t know if I ever got past it. This spring, you see him, you’re thinking about working out with him. Every time you use him on TV, or the tribute to him retiring, you’re like, wow, you’re on the same field with him.  It’s an honor. To be able to talk to him and have a different kind of conversation rather than when you’re a little kid and you’re asking for an autograph…just trying to pick his brain so you can just do things they’ve done.

There’s a profile for 3B. They think power production. Do you have to remind yourself  to stay within your own approach? Do you have to make sure you don’t go out there and try to fit that profile?

Jagielo: Reggie Jackson was out here during instructs. I was in a group with Aaron Judge, who just has ridiculous power. He miss-hits balls and he’s inside-outing balls and he’s hitting them over the right-field fence. We were talking and he said, “It doesn’t matter how the ball gets over the fence. You’re going to get your home runs. Just stay with the backspin, just stay with the middle of the field, gap approach and do your things and the ball will fly.” I think that’s when it hit me, you can’t try to be anybody else but yourself. God gave you so much talent and power. What I have now, I try to pride myself on that, the doubles, the gap guy, run production. I don’t think you have to move up in the rankings just by hitting home runs. What I’ve been trying to do is take the singles when they need to be singles and then hammering the mistakes when you need to and putting them over the fence.

Tigers camp extras

The Tigers package is up. Go take a look:

Here’s some more stuff from VP David Chadd, mostly on how the Tigers’ system isn’t perceived as being very strong externally.

Chadd: If you don’t dig down to the lower levels and you’re just skimming the upper levels at Double-A and triple-A, you’ll miss guys. If you’re just doing that, to some people, it might look like we don’t have a lot. But we think we do.

You can always improve, there’s no doubt about that. As a scout, and a scouting staff, you always have to self-evaluate, what you’ve done and players you’ve been able to promote to the Major League level. It’s not just scouting, that includes player development as well because it’s hand-in-hand. Saying that, you can never have enough talent in your system and we’re constantly trying to improve that, but I think some bright spots over there are Drew VerHagen; he’s throwing very well so far in camp. Tyler Collins has done well, Devon Travis, he’s been on a tear since he’s been over there. Daniel Fields has looked good. We’re pretty pleased with where we’re at. Are we satisfied? No. Will we ever be? No. But we’re pretty pleased with what we’ve seen so far in camp.

And here are some extras from my conversation with Devon Travis, starting with a follow up to the question that’s on the ST report about him watching all of the veterans on the Tigers when he was growing up:

You have to be careful with the veterans when you say you grew up watching them. You don’t want to make them feel old.

Travis: You’re probably right. If they heard me say that, they’d probably not be too happy.

Going into the year, there probably weren’t expectations, but looking back now,  you’ve raised the bar a little bit. You’re no longer off the radar. People are going to be watching to see what you do. The expectations have definitely gone  up.

Travis: I think that’s something I appreciate. It will make me work harder. I feel a lot of guys get to that point and they kind of shut it down and say, ‘I’ve done this or I’ve done that.’ For me, it’s just more reason to work. It gives people more reason to bash you. If you’re in an 0-for-20 slump, now it’s ‘Oh, what happened? Last year was a freak year.’ I know how all that goes and  I try to stay away from it. At the same time, it comes along with it.

One of the reasons the Tigers were interested in you was that Tigers scout Bruce Tanner saw you play against the Phillies in a Spring Training game when you were at Florida State. People on the outside may look at those games against college teams as a waste of time, but for you, it made a huge difference, didn’t it?

Travis: For us, as college guys, it’s an opportunity to go out and have fun, but at the same time, test yourself and see what it’s like to play at that level. I take every game seriously, whether it’s a scrimmage or the final game of the season. I’m thankful for that. I don’t think I even got any hits in that game, but the opportunity to play in any of those games is something every kid should take advantage of.

And my One More Guy:

I think I’ll give the nod to Austin Schotts, No. 24 on Jim’s 21-25 list. He had a terrible 2013, but it’s hard to look past his athleticism. I dig Jim’s Shane Victorino upside comp.

Astros camp extras

The Astros prospect package is live! Here’s my report from Spring Training, their new Top 20 list and Bernie Pleskoff’s look at how the system addresses short- and long-term needs.

For your viewing pleasure, the video piece from camp as well:


Some good extras from my conversations, especially with GM Jeff Luhnow. I had one Q&A left over from my chat with George Springer:

Everyone talks about all the prospects in the Astros system. As a group, are you excited collectively to get to the big leagues and help turn things around?

Springer: As players and kids, the dream is to play professional baseball at the highest peak, to get there. At the same time, you still have to have the utmost respect for the guys who are in the clubhouse now, who have gone through the struggles, who’ve had success and not had success, guys like Castro, Altuve. That’s something to honor. As a player, it shows how they’re able to handle failure, adversity and success at the same time. I think for kids who are coming up, that’s something to look up to.

Now, on to my conversation with Luhnow. We’ll start with continuing on what he was saying in the story about wanting to maintain a top level system.

Luhnow: [We hope] we can consistently maintain it in the top 10-15. Obviously, as you graduate players to the big leagues, you lose some of that. I think we’re well-positioned to do that because we have an interesting system. We’ve got players that are top prospects that are both pitchers and position players. We also have players that are spread throughout the life cycle. We’ve got really good players in rookie ball, A ball, Double-A, Triple-A. They’re not all going to show up all at one time and then we’re going to have a barren system after that.

The other thing I think we’re counting on is our second tier prospects, if you will, being good major league players. When I was in charge of the Draft and player development in  St. Louis, there were a lot of players that were considered second-tier prospects, like Daniel Descalso, Jon Jay, Allan Craig, Lance Lynn, even. None of these guys ever made the Top 100 prospects. They were good players, performers in the Minor Leagues. Ultimately, those are the guys that created a ton of value when it came to the 2011 World Series and the last couple of years. I think we’re seeing a bunch of guys like that, that are sleepers in our mind. Guys like Preston Tucker, Nolan Fontana, guys that aren’t sexy because they don’t wow you with blinding speed or awesome power, but consistent performers that are going to go out and do the job. Brady Rodgers, Andrew Thurman, guys like that, who we feel are a big part of our system right now.

One of the biggest changes we’ve realized, in doing the Top 20, is how much more talent there is at 11-20. It used to be hard to come up with 20 guys, now players are being left off who are pretty good.

Luhnow: The depth is important to us. There are going to be injuries, there are going to be poor performances. That’s just part of the nature of what happens in baseball. Also, some guys are going to step up and surprise. Jonathan Meyer is a perfect example. He’s re-establishing himself. This is a big year for him. He’s either going to make himself into a Major League player or drop off people’s radar. Even those guys not on any list (he mentioned Jio Mier as one) still have the chance to bounce back. That’ll be fun to watch this year.

We talked about camp standouts and while I went with Preston Tucker in the story, Luhnow had a lot of good things to say about Mike Foltynewicz impressing in camp as well.

Luhnow: [Major League pitching coach Brent] Strom doesn’t have a lot of history with him and then you see a guy throwing 100, who’s got that good delivery and good mentality, it’s easy to be impressed with a guy like that. I do think he has the chance to break through that last barrier and get to the big leagues and be a pretty dominant pitcher. We balance the speed to the big leagues with role in the big leagues. He could probably get there quickly as a reliever, but we really feel we want to continue to give him the chance to be a starter. So far his outings have been pretty impressive.

He’s starting to develop a repertoire that’s effective. His curveball, you used to see it at times, it’s now becoming more consistent. He has a changeup that we spent a lot of time last year trying to convince him to throw it. When you throw 100, you don’t really want to throw a changeup that much, but he’s doing it and he’s having more success with it. As he develops the repertoire, he’s going to realize in Triple-A and in the big leagues that you need a full repertoire to get guys out. It’s not just about throwing gas.

And, finally, my One More Guy:

It has to be the guy who I listed as the camp standout, Preston Tucker. I really like the Allen Craig comp Luhnow made in terms of them both having been college senior signs, later in the Draft, who just went out and hit. Craig hit his way to the big leagues and an All-Star appearance. Whether Tucker can reach those heights remains to be seen, but his .303/.373/.506 so far as a pro is certainly a very good start.

Cardinals camp extras

The Cardinals prospect package is up now. You can read the Spring Training report, peruse the Top 20 list, take a look at Bernie Pleskoff’s take and watch the video here:

I had a lot of extra good stuff from my time in Jupiter with the Cardinals. Some of that has to do with how generous with his time Cards farm director Gary LaRocque was and how well-spoken 2013 first-round pick Marco Gonzales was.

First, here’s more from my chat with Gonzalez, the lefty who came in at No. 5 on the St. Louis Top 20:

There’s often a jump for two-way guys when they focus on one skill. Have you noticed anything different? Do you feel any different?

Gonzales: I feel like I have a little more stamina already just with the PFPs we do every day, the conditioning. My body is just not as worn down. I don’t feel like an old man anymore like I did in college. I don’t know if I’ve noticed a velo jump. We haven’t been paying attention to velo yet. As far as overall body care and the way I feel, it’s a lot better already.

How important do you think it is, especially about to hit your first full season, that you were able to dedicate yourself to preparing only for pitching every five days?

Gonzales: That’s going to be the most exciting thing. Preparing the whole offseason to build my legs and core has been huge for me. Not playing every day, especially the combination of hitting and pitching on the same day, it just wears on you. I’m excited to focus and get in a routine and see how it goes.

The college season has started up. Have you been keeping up with Gonzaga (his alma mater)?

Gonzales: I was texting a bunch of my teammates and was on the phone with them before their opening weekend. I was saying it felt like I should be suiting up with those guys. So much has happened in the past year, it’s kind of crazy to look back and see where you’ve been. I’ll always miss playing for those guys, but I’ve got a good thing going on here.

LaRocque had some really great things to say about the culture and the philosophy the organization tries to foster. Rather than set up his comments, I’m just posting because they are pretty self-explanatory.

LaRocque: If you look back at over these last two years, we had 20 players plus move up from the system to the big leagues and contribute, which is really the big thing. From that standpoint, you’re right. The next group has to get the at-bats and the innings to be ready for the next wave of guys. We do think we have some players who can become the same type of contributors in the big leagues. That’s what we have to do; our system is crucial to us. You have to be ready for the next wave. I think it’s very typical of most player development systems, we have to look at it for the next 2-3-4 years. We have to make sure players go from projection to production or performance as they go to the high levels. We have a share of players who went to Quad Cities and then skipped a level, skipped high A and went to Double-A right away . To their credit, they went into Double-A and they played at the level of the league right away. Knowing your own system is crucial.

Trevor Rosenthal, Matt Adams, Oscar Taveras and Kolten Wong [all did that[. It’s important that we’ve had that level of success with those players. They  played to the league right off. When we send a player to a league, you find the players you can move or keep accelerating. We’ve found with these players, by July and August, they move ahead of the league. We tell them: April is important, but what matters is where you are in July and August.

Every day our Minor League players walk down the hallway to get to the clubhouse. Lining that hallway is a picture of every guy who is in St. Louis right now who was a Minor Leaguer. They see them, they know it can happen.

For my One More Guy candidate, I’m going to let Jim Callis do the work. He did the Top 20 and just blogged his picks for 21-25 in the system. For whatever it’s worth, I’m kind of a Greg Garcia fan.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 37,808 other followers

%d bloggers like this: